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Author: William A. Stein
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This is the SECOND ANNOUNCEMENT for the upcoming parallel computation
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workshop at MSRI:
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http://sage.math.washington.edu/msri07/
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TITLE: Interactive Parallel Computation in Support of Research
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in Algebra, Geometry and Number Theory
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LOCATION: MSRI, Will be January 29 -- February 2, 2007
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FUNDING: https://secure.msri.org/forms/workshopreg/workshopreg?event_id=410.0
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(Deadline: December 1, 2006 !!)
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INVITED SPEAKERS:
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David Bailey (Berkeley)
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Henry Cohn (Microsoft Research)
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Gene Cooperman (Northeastern University)
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Brian Granger (Tech-X)
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Robert Harrison (Oak Ridge National Lab)
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Bill Hart (Warwick)
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Yozo Hida (Berkeley)
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Jason Martin (James Madison University)
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Moreno Maza and Xie (Western Ontario)
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Alfred Noel (UMass Boston / MIT)
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Yi Qiang (UW)
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Jean-Louis Roch (France)
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Jan Verschelde (UIC)
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ORGANIZERS:
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Ifti Burhanuddin (University of Southern California, Computer Science)
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James Demmel (UC Berkeley, Mathematics and Computer Science)
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Edray Goins (Purdue University, Mathematics)
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Erich Kaltofen (North Carolina State University, Mathematics)
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Fernando Perez (University of Colorado, Applied Math)
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Chair: William Stein (University of Washington, Mathematics)
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Helena Verrill (Lousianna State University, Mathematics)
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Joe Weening (CCR, Research)
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DESCRIPTION: The goal of this workshop is to study and formulate
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practical parallel algorithms that support interactive mathematical
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research in algebra, geometry, and number theory, and to formulate
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strategies to encourage implementation and testing of these ideas.
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Computer manufacturers have begun delivering multiprocessor machines
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onto desktops; indeed, this seems to be the only means for continuing
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the pace of cpu power growth that we have become accustomed to.
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At the moment, general purpose mathematical software packages rarely
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exploit parallelism, and this is especially true in the areas of
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algebra, geometry, number theory, and combinatorics. Dramatic
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advances in performance will only be possible if parallelism can be
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harnessed in ways that are transparent to users.
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We hope to bring together a diverse group of mathematics and computer
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science researchers and students to discuss algorithms, assess current
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prospects, and suggest ways to move forward. Talks and discussions
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will cover new algorithms that exploit parallelism, specific problems
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likely to benefit from dramatic speedups from parallelism, and
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strategies to encourage implementation of these ideas.
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Examples of specific problems that we hope to address include:
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(a) Parallel multimodular and p-adic methods for dense, sparse and
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black box linear algebra over finite fields, the rational
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numbers and rational functions (e.g., linear system solutions,
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matrix multiplication, determinants and characteristic
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polynomials, kernels, etc.)
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(b) Parallel Groebner basis techniques, parallel triangular set construction
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(c) Distributed general purpose integer factorization algorithms
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(d) Uni- and multivariate polynomial arithmetic on large polynomials
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(high degree, many terms) such as multiplication, GCD, factorization,
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both for exact and approximate coefficients
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(e) Parallel methods for searching for rational points on curves
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(f) Distributed computation of large tables (e.g., elliptic curves,
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modular forms, data about L-functions, number fields, etc.)
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Applications of parallel computation to numerical problems, e.g., in
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differential equations, linear algebra, etc., tend to have been more
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fully developed than in algebraic areas, so we will invite experts in
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those areas in order to hear about techniques that have been
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successful at attacking those problems.
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In sum, we aim at the following benefits for the mathematical community:
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(a) new techniques and algorithms to exploit parallelism,
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(b) exposure of areas and problems that may benefit from these ideas,
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(c) a strategic assessment of how best to move the state of the art
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forward, and
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(d) a significant improvement of freely available general purpose
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software for mathematical research.
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FORMAT: There will be at most 3 hour long lectures a day, and will be
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plenty of time for interaction between participants. In addition, we
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will have one or two panel discussions about the current state of the
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art, and strategies for implementing support for parallel computation.
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Before the workshop the organizers will create a preliminary strategic
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plan for parallel computation that will focus discussion during the
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workshop, and which will hopefully be significantly improved during
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the workshop.
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REGISTRATION: Participants should register at the MSRI web page (when
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that page is available in a few days). Any participant interested in
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giving a talk should indicate this, and include an abstract on their
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registration form. The deadline for applications to talk is Dec. 1,
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and the organizing committee will make its selection and post a
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schedule by Dec. 15. Application for financial support can also be
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made on the MSRI registration page; we especially encourage graduate
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students to apply.
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