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<h1>Journal Copyright Policy Gossip</h1>
<h3><a href="/index.html">William Stein</a></h3>

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<h2>Contents</h2>

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<a href="#why">Why This Page Exists</a>
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<tr><td></td><td>
<a href="#submit">How to Submit New Entries</a>
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<tr><td></td><td>
<a href="#gossip">The Gossip</a>
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<h2>Why This Page Exists</h2>



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<p>I submitted something to Compositio Math recently, and they sent
me a copyright form, and it definitely did <em>not</em> say "we give you the
right to keep the paper on your web page". So I emailed them saying "you
know, I would rather like to retain the right to put the paper on my web
page. So which bits of the copyright form should I delete before I sign
it?". This was in May. I heard nothing from them until today.

<p>To my surprise, I got a brief email from them today, saying "if you
want to put your paper on the internet then why do you want to publish
your paper in a journal" ! I wrote back with the obvious reply "The
internet is not refereed; it looks much better if I publish my papers in
journals, but it's much more convenient for a 'mathematician on the
street' if I publish my paper on my web page too; to be honest, if you
insist on taking away my rights to publish the paper on my web page then
I will strongly consider publishing elsewhere". They wrote back to me
saying essentially "I think it is sad that you are not seeing things from
the publishers point of view. Consider what you are doing and get back to
us".

<p>I was not expecting to get into this position at all. I had it in my mind
that all the copyright forms I've signed recently had clauses saying "you
can put the paper on your web page but that's it". Whilst I'm not one of
these 'I demand to retain the copyright on my own papers' terrorists, I
do think that ones home page is a fantastic place to put ones papers!
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<br>I responded to Kevin as follows:

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I completely agree with you.  I also think you are doing the right
thing by asking the journals instead of simply putting the papers on
your page and daring them to sue you. 
The only other useful thing I should suggest is that one
of us should set up a web page that records the copyright policy of
various journals that we number theorists publish in.  This could save
people a lot of wasted time; for example, you wouldn't have submitted
to Compositio months ago if you had known their policy.  Also, if this
web page were popular, then the "blacklisted" journals might be more
likely to change their policy.  An informal check of Crelle and
Pac. J. Math. suggests that journals typically <em>don't</em> make their
copyright policies easily available.</td></tr>
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<a name=submit>
<h2>How to Submit New Entries</h2> 
If you would like to add an entry, please send an email to William Stein 
(<a href="mailto:[email protected]">[email protected]</a>)
with the following information:<br>
<pre>
   * Journal name
   * Journal URL
   * Link to or relevant excerpts from the copyright form
   * Gossip about practical experiences with this journal
</pre>

<a name=gossip>
<h2>The Gossip</h2>
This section records, in alphabetical order, the
 gossip I've received or dug up myself about the
copyright policies of certain journals.   You might find it of some
use, but you should treat it as gossip.  If you want to be absolutely
certain about a journal's policy, contact the journal yourself.  If
you discover that something below is incorrect, please 
<a href="mailto:[email protected]">send me an email</a>.

<ul>
<br><li> 
<a href="http://www.ams.org/jams/">American Mathematical Society Journals</a>:
Their current 
<a href="http://www.ams.org/jourhtml/ctpdual.html">copyright form</a> 
allows the author to retain copyright if he or she wishes, and
says "The Work may be reproduced by any means for educational 
and scientific purposes by the Author(s) or by others without fee 
or permission with the exception of reproduction by services that 
collect fees for delivery of documents.".  I think this means that
I can put the paper on my web page, as long as I don't charge you
to download it.

<br><br><li>
<a href="http://www.wkap.nl/journalhome.htm/0010-437X">
Compositio Mathematica:</a>
According to the Copyright section of

<a href="http://www.wkap.nl/kaphtml.htm/IFA0010-437X">this page</a>,
"The Author will be asked, upon acceptance of an article, to transfer
copyright to the publisher."  As Kevin Buzzard discovered: 
<table><tr><td width=50></td><td>
To my surprise, I got a brief email from them today, saying "if you
want to put your paper on the internet then why do you want to publish
your paper in a journal" ! I wrote back with the obvious reply "The
internet is not refereed; it looks much better if I publish my papers in
journals, but it's much more convenient for a 'mathematician on the
street' if I publish my paper on my web page too; to be honest, if you
insist on taking away my rights to publish the paper on my web page then
I will strongly consider publishing elsewhere". They wrote back to me
saying essentially "I think it is sad that you are not seeing things from
the publishers point of view. Consider what you are doing and get back to
us".
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